Marburg Kills Child August 2, 2022

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Baby dies of Ebola -like disease

Outbreak in Ghana of the Marburg virus, which has a death rate of up to 88 per cent and no known treatments, shows epidemic ‘potential’

 

A 16-month-old child who contracted the highly infectious Ebola-like Marburg virus in Ghana has died, the World Health Organization (WHO) has confirmed.

 

Three people have so far tested positive, in the country’s first Marburg outbreak. All are from the same family – the father died on June 26, followed by the child on July 20, three days after being admitted to hospital.

 

The mother of the child is currently in isolation and no longer exhibiting symptoms, Dr Francis Kasolo, WHO Representative in Ghana, told The Telegraph. She will have to undergo two rounds of testing before she can leave. The other children in the family have not tested positive.

 

Marburg is a hemorrhagic fever with a death rate of up to 88 per cent and no known treatments.

 

There are some concerns that the current outbreak, only the second in West Africa, could be spreading silently in the community, although the WHO insisted that “extensive community engagement and contact tracing” would have detected more cases if this was happening.

 

“But with these diseases, you always have to err on the side of caution,” Dr Kasolo said.

 

It is not yet clear how the family caught the virus, but Marburg is transmitted from fruit bats. It spreads among humans through direct contact with bodily fluids, surfaces and materials. Symptoms include diarrhea, fever, nausea and vomiting.

 

Last week, Dr Soce Fall at the WHO said the second contact – the wife and mother – had attended a prayer camp shortly after her husband died, where the practice of laying of hands is used to try to heal people.

 

“The mother is now in isolation and being followed up,” Dr Kasolo said. “The lady had gone to bury her husband in the north, and after the burial, she was supposed to seek prayer.

We were able to remove her from the prayer [centre] and move her to a treatment center.”

 

He added that her close contacts are also being isolated.

 

Prof David Heyman, an infectious disease epidemiologist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, told The Telegraph, that the “potential is there” for a major Marburg epidemic, although the trajectory of the current outbreak is difficult to predict.

 

“All known contacts are put under surveillance for fever onset for three weeks – the same will happen in this instance,” he said. “There have only been one or two major Marburg outbreaks – the potential is there, [but] fortunately Ghana has an excellent health system.”

 

Marburg virus was first identified in 1967 during two epidemics that occurred concurrently in Marburg and Frankfurt in Germany, and in Belgrade, Serbia. The outbreak was linked to laboratory work using African green monkeys imported from Uganda.

 

In the decades since, sporadic epidemics have been identified in countries including Uganda, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Kenya. The largest outbreak to date was in Angola in 2005, when 374 caught the virus and 329 died – a fatality rate of 88 per cent.

 

Last year, in the first outbreak to hit West Africa, Guinea also reported one case. Although 170 contacts were monitored, the virus did not spread more broadly.

 

The UN has sent an emergency team to Ghana to try to prevent a serious outbreak.


GENEVA — A child who contracted the highly infectious Ebola-like Marburg virus in Ghana has died, a World Health Organization official said on Tuesday.

The death brings the total number of fatalities in the country to three since Ghana registered its first-ever outbreak of the disease last month.

The outbreak is only the second in West Africa. The first ever case of the virus in the region was detected last year in Guinea.

The virus is transmitted to people from fruit bats and spreads among humans through direct contact with bodily fluids, surfaces, and materials, the WHO said.

The dead child, whose gender or age was not disclosed, was one of two new cases reported last week by WHO.

“Last week I mentioned the two additional cases. One is the wife of the index case and the other one is the child of the index case and the child unfortunately died, but the wife is still alive and improving,” WHO doctor Ibrahima Soce Fall told reporters.

The Ghanaian health ministry has only reported three confirmed cases and further testing remains to be done on a fourth suspected case, Soce Fall said.

The first two cases, in southern Ghana’s Ashanti region, both had symptoms including diarrhea, fever, nausea, and vomiting, before dying in hospital, the WHO said previously.

https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/1639498/child-infected-with-marburg-virus-dies-in-ghana

 

 


Child infected with Marburg virus dies in Ghana

 Aug 2, 2022  – A child who contracted the highly infectious Ebola-like Marburg virus in Ghana has died, a World Health Organization official said on Tuesday.

The death brings the total number of fatalities in the country to three since Ghana registered its first ever outbreak of the disease last month.

The outbreak is only the second in West Africa. The first ever case of the virus in the region was detected last year in Guinea.

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The virus is transmitted to people from fruit bats and spreads among humans through direct contact with bodily fluids, surfaces and materials, the WHO said.

The dead child, whose gender or age were not disclosed, was one of two new cases reported last week by WHO.

“Last week I mentioned the two additional cases. One is the wife of the index case and the other one is the child of the index case and the child unfortunately died, but the wife is still alive and improving,” WHO doctor Ibrahima Soce Fall told reporters.

The Ghanaian health ministry has only reported three confirmed cases and further testing remains to be done on a fourth suspected case, Soce Fall said.

The first two cases, in southern Ghana’s Ashanti region, both had symptoms including diarrhea, fever, nausea and vomiting, before dying in hospital, the WHO said previously.


Child dies of Marburg virus in Ebola-like disease outbreak with symptoms shared

Three people have now died from the Ebola-like Marburg virus in Ghana – which has never experienced an outbreak before – with hundreds now quarantined with the killer disease

Marburg

A child who contracted the highly infectious Ebola -like Marburg virus in Ghana has died, a World Health Organization (WHO) official has confirmed.

The death brings the total number of fatalities in the country to three since Ghana registered its first ever outbreak of the disease last month.

The outbreak is only the second in West Africa. The first ever case of the virus in the region was detected last year in Guinea.

It is transmitted to people from fruit bats and spreads among humans through direct contact with bodily fluids, surfaces and materials, the WHO said.

The dead child, whose gender or age were not disclosed, was one of two new cases reported last week by WHO.

“Last week I mentioned the two additional cases. One is the wife of the index case and the other one is the child of the index case and the child unfortunately died, but the wife is still alive and improving,” WHO doctor Ibrahima Soce Fall told reporters.

The Ghanaian health ministry has only reported three confirmed cases and further testing remains to be done on a fourth suspected case, Soce Fall said.

The first two cases, in southern Ghana’s Ashanti region, both had symptoms including diarrhoea, fever, nausea and vomiting, before dying in hospital, the WHO said previously.

Earlier this month, fears were rising as just under 100 people were quarantined with the disease.

World Health Organisation officials examine the home of a suspected Marburg virus victim

The highly infectious virus, which has previously broken out in several African countries and killed hundreds of people in the past, has been discovered in Ghana for the first time.

The illness, which has a fatality rate of up to 88%, has the potential to spread “far and wide,” according to World Health Organisation.

It is part of the same family as the Ebola disease, which gets passed from animals to humans but also from human to human through contact with an infected person’s bodily fluids.

The virus comes from animal to human transmission, but can also be spread through human contact with bodily fluids

People usually get infected with the Marburg virus after spending too much time in places like mines or caves where rousettus bat colonies (fruit bats) live.

Once infected a person can then pass it on to other people through direct or close contact with their blood, secretions, organs or other bodily fluids.

In Africa, where the virus is most common, the outbreak was traced to African green monkeys imported from Uganda, but the spread has also been linked to other animals like pigs as well.

Marburg symptoms

  • High fever
  • Severe headache
  • Severe watery diarrhoea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Cramping
  • Nausea and/or vomiting
  • Extreme lethargy
  • Non-itchy rash
  • Deep-set eyes

If they contract the virus, a fever, headache and a general feeling of being unwell are among the first signs patients will notice.

A rash that’s not itchy typically appears between two and seven days after first symptoms develop.

Soon, other symptoms like aches and pains alongside severe diarrhea can develop, which can then go on for as long as a week.

In serious cases, people may also experience bleeding from their nose, gums and vagina. They might also spot blood in their vomit and faeces. You’re also likely to have a very high fever.

If the case is fatal, most infected people die from the virus between eight and nine days after they experience their first symptom, with the cause of death usually being severe blood loss and shock.

The Marburg virus has been around since the 1960s, first being identified after 31 people were infected and seven died in 1967 during outbreaks in Marburg and Frankfurt in Germany as well as Belgrade, Serbia

Though this is the first time the virus broken out in Ghana, several African countries including the Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Africa, Kenya, Uganda and Zimbabwe have reported cases before.

A 2005 outbreak of the disease in Angola was one of the worst, killing more than 300 people.

 

https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/world-news/child-dies-marburg-virus-ebola-27636417

 


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